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Critics reviews
I'm Not There
Todd Haynes United States, 2007
It may be Haynes’s most conceptually audacious movie, organized through a series of radical visual, narrative, and tonal shifts to capture and contextualize Dylan’s own carefully stage-managed mutability.
November 21, 2019
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It divides the life and career of Bob Dylan into numerous segments played by everyone from an African-American child to a woman so that echoes of one life sound absurd in another. I’m Not There’s replication of the day’s standard documentary style and newsreel footage recalls Kane’s “March of Time” pastiche, and the result is a film that begins with the assumption that the subject cannot be demystified and so rejects altogether everything from narrative to continuity in casting.
November 17, 2015
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…Never create anything. It will be misinterpreted. It will chain you and follow you for the rest of your life. And it will never change." I’M NOT THERE is a gleeful explosion of this grumpy outlook; Dylan’s entire public life is the raw material, but Haynes uses his own passions and fascinations to free both Dylan and viewer from the burden of ‘the truth,’ and welcome them into a bigger world.
November 15, 2013
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To call the film biographical is misleading. If anything, it’s a speculative essay that uses Dylan to comment on his audience and the 60s in general. Haynes, a graduate of the semiotics department at Brown University, isn’t really concerned with Dylan as an individual; rather he presents him as a cluster of signs and texts, spread across six characters embodying phases or distinct aspects of his early career.
November 22, 2007
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