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Film of the day
  • ENORMOUS

    Sophie Letourneur France, 2019

    FROM FRANCE WITH LOVE

    French director Sophie Letourneur strikes again with her refreshingly madcap outlook on couple dynamics and the misconceptions surrounding maternalism. With uproarious humor and documentary segments shot in hospitals, this irreverent comedy subverts gender roles and breaks taboos around pregnancy.

    HD
    More info
  • SIBYL

    Justine Triet France, 2019

    Exclusive
    MUBI SPOTLIGHT

    In Justine Triet’s Sibyl—starring Gaspard Ulliel, Virginie Efira and Sandra Hüller—chaos equates to delight and the ethically wrong is exhilarating. Psychoanalysis and cinema come together in a thrillingly erotic and perilous game blurring fiction and reality, dizzyingly escaping any classification.

  • THE MUSEUM OF IMAGINATION

    Amit Dutta India, 2012

    Exclusive
    THE INIMITABLE IMAGE:
    AN AMIT DUTTA RETROSPECTIVE

    An inventive mapping of art historian Dr. B N Goswamy’s life and his work on Pahari paintings, The Museum of Imagination generates a mesmerising visual account of how creations outlast their creators. This film subtly sheds light on Amit Dutta’s own ingenious exploration of Pahari artist Nainsukh.

  • HILL OF FREEDOM

    Hong Sang-soo South Korea, 2014

    SOLVING PUZZLES: THE
    CINEMA OF HONG SANG-SOO

    Relying not only on soju to complicate rifts between romantic interests, this tender comedy from Hong Sang-soo is the director’s most daringly constructed. Led by Japanese star Ryo Kase (Silence), Hill of Freedom is a multilingual and wonderfully jumbled story that is delightfully surprising.

  • THE SIGN OF LEO

    Éric Rohmer France, 1959

    THE EVERYDAY MIRACLES
    OF ÉRIC ROHMER

    Rohmer’s debut feature lucidly conjures Parisian ’50s bohemia, uncovering the trials that buffet an artist in the face of an often-cruel world. Produced by Chabrol (and with a cheeky cameo from Godard!), this New Wave drama may not have been a commercial success yet it won the hearts of cinephiles.

  • HAM ON RYE

    Tyler Taormina United States, 2019

    A MUBI Release
    DEBUTS

    A wonderful cast of suburban teens face a rite of passage—fraught with anxiety and desire—that starts in the world of Richard Linklater and ends in that of David Lynch. Tyler Taormina’s sly but surprisingly touching debut plays with and then upends the clichés of American end-of-school comedies.

  • THE DANCE OF REALITY

    Alejandro Jodorowsky France, 2013

    Exclusive
    THE PSYCHOMAGIC CINEMA
    OF ALEJANDRO JODOROWSKY

    After 23 years away, Alejandro Jodorowsky returned to filmmaking with this surreal journey into autobiography. Utterly personal and deeply idiosyncratic, this magical realist wartime musical follows a vivid, hallucinatory dream logic. A family affair spanning generations and starring his own family.

  • GHOST IN THE SHELL

    Mamoru Oshii Japan, 1995

    Influencing filmmakers from the Wachowskis to James Cameron, Mamoru Oshii’s cyberpunk classic is one of the defining animes of its generation. Striking visuals, formed through unparalleled detail and flair, bring life to the dystopian world that houses the film’s action and vast philosophical scope.

  • THE IMMIGRANT

    James Gray United States, 2013

    PERFORMERS WE LOVE

    Dancing between international fame and the arthouse, Marion Cotillard blended both star personas in James Gray’s hushed and heartbreaking period melodrama. With fierce determination and touching luminosity, Cotillard profoundly embodies the sorrow and the hope of the New York immigrant experience.

  • DISTANT VOICES, STILL LIVES

    Terence Davies United Kingdom, 1988

    FIRST FILMS FIRST

    While Ken Loach is the best-known British auteur when it comes to portraying working-class lives, don’t forget this moving masterwork by Terence Davies. Drawing on his upbringing and paced to the rhythms of 1940s popular songs, Davies’ first feature length drama is a family story flush with passion.

  • AUGUST 32ND ON EARTH

    Denis Villeneuve Canada, 1998

    Prior to making some of the biggest sci-fi blockbusters of the 21st century, Denis Villeneuve directed this French New Wave-influenced drama. Premiering at Cannes, August 32nd on Earth highlights the striking visuals that would become Villeneuve’s trademark, here presented in a gorgeous restoration.

  • MY SISTER'S GOOD FORTUNE

    Angela Schanelec Germany, 1995

    With her I Was at Home, But… helmed as one of last year’s best arthouse movies, we look back at German auteur Angela Schanelec’s first leap into feature filmmaking. An unusual take on desire and its ambiguous nature, this ethereal drama is filled with powerful, skilfully-crafted observation.

  • THE SMALL TOWN

    Nuri Bilge Ceylan Turkey, 1997

    This stunning exploration of the life of a rural family marks Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s highly personal debut feature. Shot in poignant black-and-white cinematography, and starring members of his own family, The Small Town is a low-budget, minimalist ode to the slow rhythms of life in the countryside.

  • THE CRUISE

    Bennett Miller United States, 1998

    Prior to his success in Hollywood, Bennett Miller pioneered the digital revolution in documentary with the unforgettable The Cruise. Shooting on an affordable Mini DV handheld camera, Miller captured stripped-down yet wonderfully expressive images of one of cinema’s most electrifying subjects.

  • THE BASILISKS

    Lina Wertmüller Italy, 1963

    A socialist trailblazer, Lina Wertmüller began her career as assistant to Fellini, whose influence permeates her neorealist debut. Scored by Ennio Morricone and shot by the DP of , this mesmerizing drama delves into the trials of small-town Italian life. Bask in the glory of this new restoration.

  • JUPITER'S MOON

    Kornél Mundruczó Hungary, 2017

    Hungarian director Kornél Mundruczó’s latest feature, Pieces of a Woman, premiered at Venice 2020 to great fanfare. His previous film, Jupiter’s Moon, is a bold and provocative sci-fi spectacle that stunned audiences at Cannes with its thrilling blend of political allegory and visual wonder.

  • ALI BABA

    Jacques Becker France, 1954

    Another comedic affair from Jacques Becker, this Arabian Nights musical adaptation features stunning on-location footage of Morocco and a plethora of lively characters. Its atmosphere of Orientalist exoticism may be of its time, but the charisma of French comic legend Fernandel reigns supreme.

  • EDWARD AND CAROLINE

    Jacques Becker France, 1951

    “Once the assistant to Jean Renoir, the great but underseen Jacques Becker serves as a generational bridge to the French New Wave. The jazzy vitality, sharp insight, and comic aplomb of this 1951 portrait of a young relationship leads directly to Breathless, Rohmer, and Truffaut. A delightful gem.

  • BODY

    Małgorzata Szumowska Poland, 2015

    One of Poland’s most talented directors, Małgorzata Szumowska won her first Silver Bear for this quirky study on the side effects of human grief. Intertwining elements of mystery drama, afterlife enquiry, and dark comedy, Body also serves as a sharp, uncommon observation of modern-day ethics.

  • ALL THE VERMEERS IN NEW YORK

    Jon Jost United States, 1990

    A MUBI Release
    REDISCOVERED

    If you thought De Palma and Rivette would never mix well, you need to see this. Deliciously playful about art and money, Jon Jost’s film oozes with ‘80s charm as its nonchalant protagonists try to fall in love. We’re proud to present this seminal American indie in a gorgeous, brand new restoration.

  • CLAIRE'S CAMERA

    Hong Sang-soo France, 2017

    Shot entirely during the Cannes Film Festival, this quirky comedy is one of Hong Sang-soo’s lightest and most delightful efforts. A self-mocking take on the film industry, it stars Kim Min-hee and an irresistible Isabelle Huppert as the ultimate Frenchie, who believes that polaroids change lives!

  • THE HOLY MOUNTAIN

    Alejandro Jodorowsky Mexico, 1973

    Financed by John and Yoko (!), The Holy Mountain is an incendiary, surrealist, sacrilegious satire that outraged Cannes in 1973. Infused with tarot imagery, alchemical mysticism, and countercultural freakery, it’s a lucid dream that lodges itself directly in the subconscious—and there it stays.

  • THE KING AND THE MOCKINGBIRD

    Paul Grimault France, 1980

    A triumph of color animation, this is a delightful fable for both children and adults. With Japanese director Hayao Miyazaki (The Wind Rises, Spirited Away) citing it as a major influence, and co-scripted by French poet Jacques Prévert, The King and the Mockingbird is a work of pure poetry.

  • YOURSELF AND YOURS

    Hong Sang-soo South Korea, 2016

    Continuing our retrospective dedicated to the hilarious, anti-romantic ingenious that is Hong Sang-soo, here is yet another wise introspection of relationships and the fragility of men. Made ecstatic with a twist of surreal ambiguity— Yourself and Yours is a delightful, cinematic jigsaw puzzle.

  • THE PROFESSION OF ARMS

    Ermanno Olmi Italy, 2001

    Directed by Palme d’Or winner Ermanno Olmi (The Tree of Wooden Clogs), this rousing character study is a pacifist declaration against the human suffering of war. Quickly moving through historical details and battles, the film uses its meticulous visual design to focus on the soul of its protagonist.

  • UNDERWATER LOVE

    Shinji Imaoka Japan, 2011

    Craving a little spice in your life? Then you might try immersion in this riotous “pink musical,” directed by legendary pinku eiga director Shinji Imaoka and shot by none other than Wong Kar-wai’s fabled DP Christopher Doyle. Get ready for sex, sea creatures, reincarnation, and European synth-pop!

  • WINTER SONG

    Otar Iosseliani France, 2015

    Georgian auteur Otar Iosseliani’s idiosyncratic ensemble films depict normal life, but blossom with an absorbing sense of absurdism. Winter Song is no exception, uniting people through the skull of a beheaded aristocrat to form a satire of revolution that is dynamic, surreal, and outright hilarious.

  • GIVE ME LIBERTY

    Kirill Mikhanovsky United States, 2019

    Winner of an Independent Spirit Award, Kirill Mikhanovsky’s second film is a freewheeling and compassionate story about those at the margins of the American dream. An unpredictable and lovingly composed comedy, Give Me Liberty shines through its wonderful cast of mostly nonprofessional actors.

  • EL TOPO

    Alejandro Jodorowsky Mexico, 1970

    The quintessential “acid western,” Jodorowsky’s notorious underground film takes a gonzo odyssey into the heady realms of genre, myth and spirituality, fusing Eastern and Western ideas in the quest for enlightenment. A controversially unhinged cowboy freak-out from the mad prophet of radical cinema.

  • CHAINED FOR LIFE

    Aaron Schimberg United States, 2018

    Challenging and satirizing norms of beauty and representation in cinema, Aaron Schimberg’s second feature is brazenly unclassifiable. Shifting between the bizarre, comedic, and even melodramatic, the film remains surprising and tender through wonderful performances by Jess Weixler and Adam Pearson.