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Film of the day
  • GUESS WHO'S COMING TO DINNER

    STANLEY KRAMER United States, 1967

    PERFORMERS WE LOVE

    Starring alongside Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy, Sidney Poitier shook up a nation torn by prejudice with his electric screen presence. Released only six months after anti-miscegenation laws were ruled unconstitutional in the US, this tale of love and acceptance is a vital Hollywood milestone.

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  • TO SLEEP WITH ANGER

    CHARLES BURNETT United States, 1990

    Simmering with intergenerational tension, Charles Burnett’s folkloric masterpiece weaves magical realism into familial dispute, revealing the hidden conflicts of Black middle-class life. Enigmatic yet menacing, Danny Glover is the ultimate devil’s advocate who wreaks havoc with his terrifying charm.

  • BEFORE MIDNIGHT

    RICHARD LINKLATER United States, 2013

    Witnessing the evolution of Jesse and Céline’s relationship over two decades ranks among the most sublime cinematic experiences. This final instalment of Richard Linklater’s landmark “Before Trilogy” is an epic triumph of storytelling—a sun-kissed reunion at the intersection of love, time, and film.

  • THE SLEEPING NEGRO

    SKINNER MYERS United States, 2021

    Social commentary gets an absurdist twist in Skinner Myers’s confrontational film, which skewers conservative intolerance and liberal pretension with wit and rage. A bold debut that looks to luminaries like James Baldwin and Andrei Tarkovsky to speak on the Black experience in contemporary America.

  • SOFTIE

    SAMUEL THEIS France, 2021

    FROM FRANCE WITH LOVE

    Retreating to the classroom as a haven from a troubled upbringing, a lonely boy is awakened to misguided fixations in Samuel Theis’s thorny coming-of-age drama. In a performance that’s wise beyond his years, newcomer Aliocha Reinert channels the innocence as well as the rebellious spirit of youth.

  • TUESDAY

    CHARLOTTE WELLS United Kingdom, 2015

    Seven years before she wowed critics and audiences alike with the dazzling Aftersun, Scottish filmmaker Charlotte Wells forged another soulful tale of fathers and daughters with this intimate debut short. From its simple premise, Tuesday draws out a bruised inner life fit to burst with yearning.

  • A HUMAN POSITION

    ANDERS EMBLEM Norway, 2022

    Exclusive
    FESTIVAL FOCUS:
    ROTTERDAM

    Pastel surrounds, gentle sighs, the calm contentment of a housecat—on the west coast of Norway, a young woman lives in cozy domesticity. Gradually she is stirred by a curiosity that opens her up to the outside in this elegantly framed, quietly moving film about finding our place in the world.

  • A BIGGER SPLASH

    JACK HAZAN United Kingdom, 1973

    Few films capture the madness of a breakup like this ground-breaking, semi-fictionalised account of David Hockney’s harrowing creative process. As full of dreamy eroticism as his landmark pool paintings, this is a bracingly intimate look at the British artist’s imagination—in a glowing restoration!

  • DIAMANTINO

    GABRIEL ABRANTES, DANIEL SCHMIDT Portugal, 2018

    A football fairy tale for the 21st century and madcap adventure that’s the perfect antidote to an even madder world. This warm, big-hearted fantasy delights in causing trouble and mixing its cultural references, while satirizing corruption, celebrity, and greed. You won’t have seen anything like it!

  • WHAT HAPPENED WAS...

    TOM NOONAN United States, 1994

    SUNDANCE FAVORITES

    In 1994, the great character actor Tom Noonan took the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance for his remarkable directorial debut. Then the film all but vanished. A razor sharp, brilliantly funny portrait of urban loneliness, this 4K restoration resurrects one of the best independent films of its decade.

  • THE WOLFPACK

    CRYSTAL MOSELLE United States, 2015

    Documentarian Crystal Moselle took home Sundance’s Grand Jury Prize for this, her sensational debut—following seven cinema-obsessed siblings, confined to their Lower East Side apartment. An endearing depiction of the fraternal dynamic and the eventual slow socialization of these young men.

  • BECOMING MALE IN THE MIDDLE AGES

    PEDRO NEVES MARQUES Portugal, 2022

    A MUBI Release
    BRIEF ENCOUNTERS

    This luminous miniature of speculative science fiction from Portuguese artist-filmmaker Pedro Neves Marques ponders the very meaning of the nuclear family. Shot on 16mm and bathed in natural light, Becoming Male in the Middle Ages is a provocative meditation on gender, identity, and reproduction.

  • THESE BIRDS WALK

    OMAR MULLICK, BASSAM TARIQ Pakistan, 2012

    An impressionistic documentary about the plight of Pakistani orphans and runaways, These Birds Walk is an immersive and richly rewarding vérité portrait of childhood. The film’s subjects respond candidly to the camera, which captures their daily lives with compassion and with grace.

  • WE ARE LITTLE ZOMBIES

    MAKOTO NAGAHISA Japan, 2019

    Director Makoto Nagahisa’s hyperstylized coming-of-age tale follows four adolescent orphans as they find unusual ways to process their emotions and deal with societal pressure. The laughs keep coming throughout this ingenious dark comedy, which employs a dizzying array of audiovisual techniques.

  • TOUCHY FEELY

    LYNN SHELTON United States, 2013

    What happens when a massage therapist turns out to have a phobia of touching other people’s skin? Playing on our lurking anxieties about human contact, this quirky drama stars alt-indie superstars Elliot Page and Rosemary DeWitt, and was made by the late, great American independent, Lynn Shelton.

  • TANGERINE

    SEAN BAKER United States, 2015

    How can a movie shot on a mobile phone look as gorgeous as this intrepid portrait of female friendship? Filmmaking tricks aside, Sean Baker’s fifth feature gives voice to one of Los Angeles’ least explored subcultures while emerging as a tactful working-girl revenge hit. A major hit at Sundance!

  • CITY OF WOMEN

    FEDERICO FELLINI Italy, 1980

    The one and the only Marcello Mastroianni reunited with the irrepressible master of Italian cinema Fellini seventeen years after 8 1/2 for a story about—what else?—the arthouse dreamboat being beset by women of all kinds. A drifting, aging playboy goes soul-searching in a newly feminist Italy.

  • RESULTS

    ANDREW BUJALSKI United States, 2015

    With more famous actors and a less lo-fi look than his earlier films (Funny Ha Ha), Results is still unmistakably Andrew Bujalski. As it wavers between the peppy credulity of a self-starter and the wry cynicism of a divorcé, this warm rom-com echoes the highs and lows of independent filmmaking.

  • ACTUAL PEOPLE

    KIT ZAUHAR United States, 2021

    A MUBI Release
    MUBI SPOTLIGHT

    Scrappy low-budget filmmaking has a new kid on the block in actor, director, and writer Kit Zauhar. Zeroing in on an Asian-American student’s premature case of postgraduate drift, she brings an altogether different charm to independent cinema with her wry, plucky, and perceptive first film.

  • THE BRAVES

    ANAÏS VOLPÉ France, 2021

    Powered by a pair of electric lead performances, this dynamic debut from Anaïs Volpé fizzes with devil-may-care optimism. Shot with sensual abandon by independent cinema’s preeminent digital miracle-worker Sean Price Williams, The Braves is a euphoric tale of female friendship and restless ambition.

  • THE MAD FOX

    TOMU UCHIDA Japan, 1962

    Cloaked like its characters in a rich red hue, Tomu Uchida’s stunning, supernatural fantasy draws from the theatrical worlds of kabuki and bunraku for its dreamlike tale of mistaken identities and shape-shifting spirits. This expressionistic marvel even merges animation into its folkloric tableaux.

  • SORRY WE MISSED YOU

    KEN LOACH United Kingdom, 2019

    Britain’s pre-eminent auteur of politically-engaged social realism, Ken Loach followed up his Palme d’Or win for I, Daniel Blake with this scathing indictment of the gig economy. Powerfully intimate, Sorry We Missed You is a fierce condemnation of the ruinous practices of the modern job market.

  • THE PARTY

    SALLY POTTER United Kingdom, 2017

    A state-of-the-nation satire from the reliably risk-taking Sally Potter (Orlando), this brisk and combustible dark comedy raucously bustles with surprises and secrets. Filmed in black-and-white, the star-studded Party is led by a stately Kristin Scott Thomas and scene-stealing Patricia Clarkson.

  • HOLD ME TIGHT

    MATHIEU AMALRIC France, 2021

    Vicky Krieps is luminous as a woman under the influence in this mysterious family drama from the French multihyphenate Mathieu Amalric. Told in puzzle-piece fragments, the film has the beautiful fragility of broken glass and feels, contrary to the title, as though it would be hazardous to touch.

  • MARTIN MARGIELA: IN HIS OWN WORDS

    REINER HOLZEMER Germany, 2019

    Possessing an edgy, eccentric elegance, Martin Margiela’s marvelously avant-garde creations forever altered the course of fashion history. As playful as the mischievous mind of the visionary designer, Reiner Holzemer’s intimate documentary portrait seeks to unlock the mystery of the Margiela touch.

  • THE FLOWER OF EVIL

    CLAUDE CHABROL France, 2003

    All the skeletons come crawling out of the closet in Claude Chabrol’s late-career masterpiece, which twists the knife into the sordid hypocrisies of French provincialism. With a touch of murder and a sprinkle of incest, this devilish cinematic feast exposes the rotten core of generational wealth.

  • MADAME BOVARY

    CLAUDE CHABROL France, 1991

    Starring Isabelle Huppert as Gustave Flaubert’s infamous heroine, Claude Chabrol’s Madame Bovary reinvents the period drama on an epic scale. The pictorial pleasures of the Oscar®-nominated costumes are filtered through Hitchcockian camera angles, revealing the unsettling ennui of provincial life.

  • THE CASE OF HANA & ALICE

    SHUNJI IWAI Japan, 2015

    A murder case lies at the heart of Shunji Iwai’s cozy mystery, yet the real source of suspense arises from the all-too-relatable conundrums faced by teenagers. From the anxiety of transferring schools to the thrill of crushes, this slice-of-life anime is lovingly sensitive to the woes of girlhood.

  • LADY MACBETH

    WILLIAM OLDROYD United Kingdom, 2016

    Florence Pugh broke into the mainstream at age 21 with her revelatory and transfixing performance in William Oldroyd’s Lady Macbeth. Period piece meets thriller in this adaptation of Nikolai Leskov’s 1965 novella, resulting in an uncompromising and subversive story of female revenge.

  • THE MAN WHO FELL TO EARTH

    NICOLAS ROEG United Kingdom, 1976

    David Bowie committed to his first and most soulful performance in Nicolas Roeg’s singular film. A perfect meeting of minds: Roeg, the great experimenter of narrative forms, and Bowie, the undefinable mystery, together conjure a masterwork of sci-fi, shot in the arid landscape of New Mexico.